New Media, Old News: Journalism and Democracy in the Digital Age

by Natalie Fenton (Editor)

With massive changes in the media environment and its technologies, interrogating the nature of news journalism is one of the most urgent tasks we face in defining the public interest today. The implications are serious, not just for the future of the news, but also for the practice of democracy. In a thorough empirical investigation of journalistic practices in different news contexts, this book explores how technological, economic, and social changes have reconfigured news journalism, and the consequences of these transformations for a vibrant democracy in our digital age. The result is a piercing examination of why understanding news journalism matters now more than ever. It is essential reading for students and scholars of journalism and new media.

About the Author

  • Paperback:¬†232 pages
  • Publisher:¬†SAGE Publications Ltd; 1 edition (November 25, 2009)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This important book brilliantly explores the contradiction between the transforming potential of new technologies and the stifling constraints of the free market and corporate power
Greg Philo
Glasgow University Media Group

In the great and significant debate about the future of news and information, Natalie Fenton has identified important new players and new ways in which society will be educated in the world in which they function. Few people have come so freshly and perceptively to describe the ethical and other challenges that occur when old reportorial modes are so substantially altered
Monroe Price
Director, Center for Global Communication Studies (CGCS) at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania

Everyone knows that the internet “changes everything.” But hardly anyone has studied it systematically enough to say anything more specific about how exactly it changes things. Here’s a collection that provides some real evidence about how the internet is and isn’t changing journalism and political communication. The essays that make up this volume are rich with real-life data about the working lives of journalists, bloggers, politicians and more, and also with sophisticated insight about how technology interacts with political and economic change. The analysis it provides is broad and nuanced, giving a complex sense of the range of different forms of news and debate that exist online
Dan Hallin
Professor and Chair, Department of Communication, University of California, San Diego

This is journalism scholarship at its very best. New Media, Old News offers a radical and provocative assessment of the complexities of news, news media and journalism in the age of digital media and global news. Authoritative, yet accessible, this collection will undoubtedly shape scholarly and public debate about journalism and new media. But it also articulates a passionate commitment to the view that – more than ever – “news matters.” This book is nothing less than essential reading for everyone interested in the past, present and future of news and journalism
Bob Franklin
Professor of Journalism Studies, Cardiff University

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